Recycling Education

Education

Get educated about what items are acceptable.

Education

Get educated about what items are acceptable and which items are not.
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Contamination

Problems that stem from contaminated recycling loads.

Contamination

Single stream recycling toters are currently contaminated with material that cannot be recycled.
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E-Waste

E-Waste is any electronic device that is unwanted.

E-Waste

Cell phones, computers, laptops, tablets, appliances, and more can all become e-waste.
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4R’s of recycling

Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, Recover

4R’s of recycling

Help Whitetail be Pennsylvania’s leading environmentally correct waste hauler by partnering with us and practicing the 4R’s in your home today!
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Whitetail Disposal is committed to doing our part by providing weekly “single-stream” recycling throughout 100% of our route system. We are the only company in Berks, Bucks, Lehigh and Montgomery counties that provides weekly recycling throughout its service area.

Whitetail Disposal is proudly partnered with CRI. Another local, family owned & operated recycling center in Hamburg PA. Click here to see how the Partnership with WD & CRI ensures you are doing your part for environmental sustainability

One Toter.

Multiple Benefits​

It’s Simple

All acceptable recyclables go loose and properly rinsed out, in the toter.

It’s Simple

All acceptable recyclables go loose and properly rinsed out, in the toter.

Less Time

Using one toter maximizes efficiency.

Less Time

Using one toter maximizes efficiency.

Reducing Waste

All types of recycling can be reused and given new life.

Reducing Waste

All types of recycling can be reused and given new life.

Less Traffic

Using one toter means pick up is easier which means we reduce emissions by having less trucks out on the road.

Less Traffic

Using one toter means pick up is easier which means we reduce emissions by having less trucks out on the road.

Multiple size options to fit your needs

Whitetail can accommodate any recycling need with many different toter sizes. Just ask.

Multiple size options to fit your needs

Whitetail can accommodate any recycling need with many different toter sizes. Just ask.

Saving Energy

By not having to produce new products, recycling provides noticeable savings in energy costs.

Saving Energy

By not having to produce new products, recycling provides noticeable savings in energy costs.

Clear bags must be used for ANY bagged recycling.

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If clear bags are not utilized for recycling, our team will have to collect it as trash.

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Clear “recycle” bags can be purchased at many locations including online at Amazon, Home Depot, and Lowes.

Recycling

Guide

To learn more, please reference our guide below and expand the sections that are relevant to you. Recyclable items can vary based on your location. Check local programs to find out what is recyclable in your area.

ACCEPTABLE ITEMS

These items can go in your recycling bin, as long as they’re clean and dry.
 
Plastic bottles

Recycle plastics by shape: bottles, jars, jugs and tubs. The “chasing arrows” symbol doesn’t necessarily mean it’s recyclable.

Clean and dry containers, then put the cap back on before tossing in the bin.

Metal Cans / Containers

Recycle empty tin, aluminum and steel cans.

Please be sure to rinse them out first.

newspapers

Paper, newspaper and magazines are good to recycle.

If paper is soiled or wet, compost it.

Cardboard (Flattened)

Flatten and bundle all cardboard and paperboard when not placing inside toter.

Please note pizza boxes are trash and not recyclable.

Paperboard

Make sure containers are rinsed out and completely empty to avoid contamination.

Bottles
Make sure glass and containers are rinsed out and completely empty to avoid contamination.

NOT ACCEPTABLE IN YOUR BIN

Try to reduce and reuse these items instead of putting them in the trash.
 

Do not bag recyclables in black or non see through bags. They must be loose in the bin or in a clear see through bag.

plastic-bags

Plastic bags are not accepted as part of curbside recycling programs – they get tangled in equipment and threaten worker safety.

Plastic bags can be recycled at most grocery stores.

Plastic wrap, bubble wrap, sandwich bags and freezer bags should not go in the recycle bin.

Reuse whenever possible for presents, moving, or storage of similar items, or look for local options to recycle.

Flexible packaging like chip bags and juice or soup pouches cannot be recycled in curbside programs.

This type of packaging is made from multiple materials preventing it from being recycled.

Cups with plastic or waxed coatings are not recyclable. The plastic lids should be trashed as well.

Invest in and carry a reusable cup instead.
 
Styrofoam

Polystyrene foam, plastic “to-go” containers and cups are made of non-recyclable materials, and are not acceptable in the curbside recycling program.

Packing peanuts aren’t recyclable either, however some shipping stores will take peanuts back for reuse.
 

OTHER MATERIALS

Typically not accepted for curbside pickup. Check local programs for disposal options.
 

Garden hoses, rope, leashes, wire, holiday lights, string and chains should never go in the recycling bin.

“Tanglers” can wrap around equipment, endanger workers and shut down entire recycling centers. If they are still in good condition, donate them.

Dirty diapers’ and pet waste’s will spoil all of the recyclables, turning the load to trash. They shouldn’t be recycled!

Trash these instead and keep recyclables clean and dry.

Clothing, textiles, shower curtains, mini-pools, fencing and furniture don’t go in the recycling.

Check local programs for reuse and recycling options first. Put them in the trash bin if no other options are available.

Medical waste can pose a safety hazard and never goes in curbside recycling or waste bins.

Needles are especially dangerous so contact your local provider.

Car parts, scrap metal, tires, filters, propane cylinders and the like are safety hazards if put in curbside recycling or trash bins.

Check locally for special collection programs or take them to a local retailer or scrap recycler.

The Truth About

Recycling

Learn more about recycling by understanding the common myths that can help ensure your materials aren’t contaminated and successfully make it all the way through the recycling process.

Research shows convenience and commitment are required for maximum recycling. For instance, do you recycle in several rooms of your home? If you only recycle in the kitchen, recyclables in your home office or bathroom get thrown away. So make recycling a collaborative effort where everyone participates, enabling the most recycling of the right materials.

Only in some cases. Check the table above and local program guidelines to see what’s recyclable and what’s not.

Many plastics cannot be made into new products. Recycle plastics by shape: bottles, jars, jugs and tubs.

Containers should be clean, but don’t have to be spotless.

While all bottles, cans and containers should be clean, dry and free of most food waste before you place them in your recycling container, they don’t need to be spotless. The goal is to make sure they are clean enough to avoid contaminating other materials, like paper, or your un-lined kitchen recycling bin. Try using a spatula to scrape cans and jars, and putting recyclables in your sink among the dishes you are rinsing to share that same water to rinse and remove residue.

False. Non-recyclable items are not accepted curbside.

Non-recyclable items contaminate recyclables. Recyclables stuck inside plastic bags are at risk for never making it through the recycling process. Conversely, recyclable items placed into garbage containers are hauled to a landfill and cannot be recovered effectively. The right thing to do is put the right recyclables in the recycling container and non-recyclables into garbage containers. Recyclables with the greatest impact are bottles, cans, paper and cardboard.

Just because it’s plastic doesn’t mean it’s recyclable in your recycling program.

If it’s not bottles, cans, paper or cardboard, it probably doesn’t belong in your curbside mixed recycling bin and may even require special handling. Just because an item is made from plastic, or contains plastic parts, doesn’t mean recycling facilities can handle it. There are other resources (e.g., Earth911.org) that can help answer questions about what to do with non-recyclables or household hazardous waste.

The acceptance of glass in recycling programs varies by jurisdiction.


Glass recycling collection varies in communities across the U.S. Some communities recycle glass with all other recyclables; some collect glass separately at the curb in its own container; and some cities have specific recycling drop-off locations for glass. Some states, like CA, CT, OR, IA, MI, ME, VT, MA and NY, have ‘bottle bill’ laws that allow for a per-bottle deposit when bottles are brought to return centers or retailers for recycling. Please refer to your community’s recycling guidelines for local program information.